Working For Healthcare - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Working For Healthcare

Laura Boyd turns 81 in a few days and she still works 40 hours a week.  She answers phones and works the switchboards at United Regional. She retired once, but after just 16 months, she came back to work.

"Your bills go on whether you work or not, and all of my savings I had saved during that time, I went through like water, so I had to go back to work," Said Boyd.

She's not alone. Experience Works, a branch of Texas Workforce Solutions, is a work skills training program for people 55 and older. Training assistant Phyllis Green says the demand for the program has exploded since 2006.

"I was advertising to get people to come out and be on our program then.  Now, I sit at my desk and answer phone calls all day long," said Boyd.

In the last year alone, Experience Works has helped nearly three thousand senior citizens in Texas.

The main reason is social security isn't supporting them.

But social security isn't the only problem for seniors.  Boyd is diabetic and has already had a mini-stroke.  That means insurance coverage is hard for her to find without a full-time job, even with the help of medicare.

But see, it don't pay everything, and you're still gonna have an out-of-the pocket money," said Boyd.

Lanell Louton is one of those people who felt the difference between how much social security pays and the actual cost of living. She works part time at Experience Works, helping people with computer skills and questions as they look for jobs of their own.

"I was looking for a way to make a little extra money. I'm not ready to sit down in the rocking chair just yet, said Boyd."

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