Spiders Making Their Way to Texoma Homes - KAUZ-TV: Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Spiders Making Their Way to Texoma Homes

They're creepy and crawly, and they're making their way into your homes. Newschannel6 spoke to the experts about these eight-legged creatures who are posing a threat to Texomans.

Wichita falls has their own Spiderman. He doesn't climb walls, but David Shoop does help the community.

"People put these in closets and under beds so if they're is a spider in that area the trap instead of a shoe or up on a bed where someone's sleeping," said David Shoop, Manager, Shoop's Texas Termite & Pest Control.

According to a nurse from the Clinics of North Texas, she says people are coming into the clinic for spider bites on a daily basis. She even says some days doctors are treating two bites a day.

"Right now its not uncommon to find spiders inside your homes you'll always find them around the outside or up against the concrete. The fact that they're moving around tying to find over wintering spots is not uncommon," said Shoop.

Shoop says the recent shift in weather has spiders in high pursuit of food and shelter and they are using your homes as refuge. According to Shoop North Texas should be weary of two spiders- Brown Recluses and Black Widows.

Black Widows are considered the most venomous spider in the United States and can be life threatening in certain cases, and they like to hide.

"Always in the closets and dark places they'll get into your box springs and lay egg and spin their sacks in the shoes they love to go inside shoes," said Shoop.

Shoop encourages Texomans to shake their clothes and check in their box springs to make sure spiders haven't formed a dime- size, white silk sacks in them.

"Usually if they're is a web there there's an active spider or active spiders in your home," said Shoop.

Shoop says another spider that's common in Texoma is the Hobo Spider, but he says many people confuse it with Wolf Spiders. Both types are venomous, but Shoop says neither pose any real threat.

Samantha Jordán, Newschannel Six

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