USPS Officials On Hand to Discuss Possible Mail Annex Closure - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

USPS Officials On Hand to Discuss Possible Mail Annex Closure

Wednesday evening almost 100 concerned residents and postal workers made their way to Midwestern State University all ready to speak out against the possible closing of the Mail Annex.

This move could mean that zip codes beginning with 763 would have their mail processed in Fort Worth instead of here.

This comes after an announcement last month that the United States Postal Service had a loss of $8.5 billion. That's already on top of their loss of $6 billion the two previous years.

Now they're cutting spending anyway they can and that could affect hundreds of thousands of Texomans.

Those who came had various concerns.  Some were concerned about relocating for their job, others think the move will slow down the time it takes to receive a letter.  On Wednesday United States Postal Service representatives were there to answer those questions.

Residents and postal workers filled the room at MSU, all eyes on the presentation at hand.

"This is going to affect my job," said Postal Worker Raymond Cahoon.  "Whether I have to move anywhere between 750 to 100,000 miles."

Cahoon came to the meeting looking for straight answers from representatives.

"I don't think it's realistic them wanting to shut the Wichita Falls Processing Annex.  I don't think Fort Worth can turn the mail around in time," said Cahoon.

Public Affairs Information Officer with USPS, Sam Bolen says they can process and deliver the mail without any delays.

"The mail that's processed here can easily be transported, it's about a two hour drive.  We can turn that mail around with the highly-automated equipment that we have in Fort Worth and get it back here in time for the carriers and it shouldn't skip a beat," said Bolen.

This was the first meeting of it's kind in Wichita Falls but not around the United States, many other cities have been faced with the issue of shutting down their local mail processing center in order to save the USPS money during their worst financial downfall.

"Right now in our economic condition we can't really afford to keep a processing center here with everything that's involved," said Bolen.  "We can combine those operations and save a lot of money."

They estimate $2.2 million will be saved and the estimated 70 jobs will not be lost
but rather those employees would have to relocate someplace else.  It's a decision that has yet to be made but one that will have a drastic impact on Texoma.

Eight counties would be affected, that's about 160,000 people.  No decision was made at this meeting.  It can take months for the USPS to make a decision on this issue and when they do News Channel 6 will have the very latest.  

USPS owes $12 billion, just $3 billion below its legal debt ceiling.  That's a major problem since it has projected a loss again next year.

Crystal Hall News Channel 6.

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