Fire Impact on Wildlife - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Fire Impact on Wildlife

The recent wild fires are making an impact on wildlife.  Archer County put out a warning this week about feral hogs moving into populated areas.  The hogs are moving away from the charred grass because there are no nutrients there. Officials say once the grass grows again, hogs will move back into more rural areas.

Wild hogs are a huge problem in Texas because they don't have any natural predators; they're fast, aggressive, and hard to kill. But officials say some wildlife did perish in the flames.  River Bend Nature Center Administrative Assistant Jennica Howes says, "Of course, with prairie fires sometimes you do get casualties that don't escape in time. But actually, it's a good thing because what happens is, it regenerates their food source".

Wildlife experts say fires actually benefit wild life.  A prairie fire is essential to a prairie ecosystem; without it, it doesn't exist.  The fires get rid of old vegetation and reseed the soil with genesis and essential nutrients.  Seeds are blowing in the wind all the time, and the charred grass will turn into newly blossomed grass in no time.  These animals will return to their habitat.

Howes says, "A wild fire is essential for a healthy prairie ecosystem. All the plants and animals and stuff on the prairie are adapted for wildfire and drought. So they're the ones that are going to survive.  It's the invasive species that don't belong there that are going to die. So it's essential for it to be healthy".

Officials say it's like trees, leaves fall off in the winter and blossom in the spring.  They are warning residents to keep an eye out for possible dangerous animals.  However, officials say it will not be a long-term problem.  They say mice, owels, bison, and coyotes also run away from charred grass.

Jessica Abuchaibe, Newschannel 6

  • News HeadlinesNewsMore>>

  • Huge squirrel population chomps crops, driving farmers nuts

    Huge squirrel population chomps crops, driving farmers nuts

    Sunday, September 16 2018 10:56 AM EDT2018-09-16 14:56:23 GMT
    Wednesday, September 19 2018 5:32 AM EDT2018-09-19 09:32:07 GMT
    (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty). In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 photo, a squirrel carries a walnut across a street in Portland, Maine. A booming squirrel populations has forced drivers in parts off New England to dodge the small rodents as they dart acros...(AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty). In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 photo, a squirrel carries a walnut across a street in Portland, Maine. A booming squirrel populations has forced drivers in parts off New England to dodge the small rodents as they dart acros...

    Farmers in New England are getting harassed by bumper crop of squirrels.

    Farmers in New England are getting harassed by bumper crop of squirrels.

  • Kavanaugh's accuser wants FBI probe before she testifies

    Kavanaugh's accuser wants FBI probe before she testifies

    Tuesday, September 18 2018 1:30 AM EDT2018-09-18 05:30:22 GMT
    Wednesday, September 19 2018 12:44 AM EDT2018-09-19 04:44:17 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alex Brandon). In this Sept. 6, 2018 photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh reacts as he testifies after questioning before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Official Washington is scrambling Monday to assess...(AP Photo/Alex Brandon). In this Sept. 6, 2018 photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh reacts as he testifies after questioning before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Official Washington is scrambling Monday to assess...

    Republicans reversed course and agreed to the hearing in the face of growing demands by GOP senators to hear directly from Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, now a psychology professor in California.

    Republicans reversed course and agreed to the hearing in the face of growing demands by GOP senators to hear directly from Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, now a psychology professor in California.

  • Residents voice concerns at Mayor Santellana's town hall

    Residents voice concerns at Mayor Santellana's town hall

    Wednesday, September 19 2018 12:15 AM EDT2018-09-19 04:15:21 GMT
    (Source: KAUZ)(Source: KAUZ)
    (Source: KAUZ)(Source: KAUZ)

    Wichita Falls Mayor Stephen Santellana's held a town hall at the MPEC Tuesday afternoon. Some residents in attendance shared their concerns about the direction the city is going in and whether the plans city officials had in mind fit the needs of the community. 

    Wichita Falls Mayor Stephen Santellana's held a town hall at the MPEC Tuesday afternoon. Some residents in attendance shared their concerns about the direction the city is going in and whether the plans city officials had in mind fit the needs of the community. 

Powered by Frankly