Cool Jobs in Texoma - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Cool Jobs in Texoma

While many of us are trying to avoid the triple digit heat, some people in Texoma are actually trying to keep warm this summer. Newschannel six spoke with workers from Texoma Ice and Texas Best Meats. And employees from both groups layer up when they clock in.

Jon Reese is one of the owners of Texoma Ice.  Reese says, "A lot of people think it's the coolest place to be. But after about 30-45 minutes, you're ready to go outside and warm back up."  Ice baggers there work six to eight hours a day, seven days a week. They wear toboggans, winter coats, and gloves to keep from freezing. But the longest they can stand inside this freezing room is an hour before going outside to warm back up. 

Reese says, "Because you're working in a room that's anywhere from 12 to 25 degrees depending what time of day it is. So, it'd be just like in the middle of winter, being outside for that long."  Reese says the extreme temperatures outside don't help. He says, "Going in and out of the heat into the cold. It's uncomfortable."

Workers at Texas Best Meats spend their day in a room that never gets above freezing. But they don't mind. One of its workers Billy Bracey says, "I'll tell you what. It's nice in here compared to the temperatures outside. I'd rather be in work. And Brian Howery says, "When you're driving home, and you see somebody out there working on the pave roads, you're thankful to have a job that's nice and cool. 30 degrees in here."

Texas Best Meats workers did say although they do enjoy working in cold rooms while it's so hot outside, they layer up at work with extra shirts and thermal coats. Texoma Ice says this is the busiest time they've had in the seven years they've been open. They have 16 out of 20 employees working seven days a week.

 

Jessica Abuchaibe, Newschannel 6.

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