Drought: Nearly 700 Dead Trees In Amarillo Parks - KAUZ-TV: Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Drought: Nearly 700 Dead Trees In Amarillo Parks

AMARILLO, Texas (AP) - The devastating Texas drought has contributed to the deaths of more than twice as many trees as normal in Amarillo parks.
     
The Amarillo Globe-News reported Thursday that city parks typically lose about 300 trees per year. City estimates indicate almost 700 trees have died, in the past fiscal year, amid the drought.
     
Parks superintendent Clint Stoddard estimates it will cost about $262,000 to remove and replace the trees, in an effort that started this week and will continue into the spring.
     
City parks were watered several times a week in April, May and June, leading to higher water bills for the Parks and Recreation Department. Citywide voluntary water restrictions were implemented by mid-summer. Park watering was limited.
     
Stoddard says the department has an inventory of more than 14,000 trees.

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