Fee-for-Filing Scam Alert - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Fee-for-Filing Scam Alert

AUSTIN - The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) warns Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants to be aware of unethical business operators who may try to charge a fee to file unemployment claims. Filing for unemployment benefits through TWC is always free.

Claimants who sign on for so-called "fee-for-filing" scams:

  • could later discover unemployment claims were never filed on their behalf.
  • may have given their Social Security number to someone they believed to be a TWC employee.

Claimants should always seek online UI information through www.texasworkforce.org or by using the email form found on TWC's website.

TWC officials wants to ensure that UI benefits only go to those who qualify and that no one is taken advantage of by fraudulent business operators illegally posing as a TWC staff member.

UI claimants also are reminded that TWC unemployment specialists never:

  • make home visits
  • ask for Personal Identification Numbers (PIN)
  • use text messages to contact claimants.

Claimants should only give personal information when filing for benefits online at www.texasworkforce.org or when speaking to an unemployment benefit customer service representative on the Tele-Center phone filing system.

It is imperative that UI claimants do not pay for a government service that is free.

The UI program, funded through employer taxes, provides temporary, partial-income replacement to workers who have lost their jobs through no fault of their own. TWC administers and oversees the collection of taxes from employers and the payment of UI benefits to qualified claimants.

To report possible fraud, call the TWC Fraud and Program Abuse Hotline at 800-252-3642.

  • News HeadlinesNewsMore>>

  • Amid anti-immigrant sentiment, some Spanish speakers wary

    Amid anti-immigrant sentiment, some Spanish speakers wary

    Saturday, May 26 2018 2:14 PM EDT2018-05-26 18:14:01 GMT
    Saturday, May 26 2018 9:25 PM EDT2018-05-27 01:25:57 GMT
    (AP Photo/Chris Carlson). Lilly Mucarsel, a native of Ecuador, poses for a picture in her office Friday, May 25, 2018, in Tustin, Calif. Mucarsel, 62, of Southern California finds herself reverting to English when she attends a baseball game or goes to...(AP Photo/Chris Carlson). Lilly Mucarsel, a native of Ecuador, poses for a picture in her office Friday, May 25, 2018, in Tustin, Calif. Mucarsel, 62, of Southern California finds herself reverting to English when she attends a baseball game or goes to...

    The Trump administration's harsh rhetoric and tougher policies toward immigrants have made some Spanish speakers self-conscious about speaking other languages in public.

    The Trump administration's harsh rhetoric and tougher policies toward immigrants have made some Spanish speakers self-conscious about speaking other languages in public.

  • American jailed in Venezuela for 2 years arrives in US

    American jailed in Venezuela for 2 years arrives in US

    Saturday, May 26 2018 9:53 AM EDT2018-05-26 13:53:22 GMT
    Saturday, May 26 2018 9:25 PM EDT2018-05-27 01:25:49 GMT
    Senator Corker’s office tweeted out an image of Josh Holt and his wife before leaving Venezuela. (Source: Twitter/@SenBobCorker)Senator Corker’s office tweeted out an image of Josh Holt and his wife before leaving Venezuela. (Source: Twitter/@SenBobCorker)

    A Utah man has been released from a jail in Venezuela after spending nearly two years behind bars on weapons charges.

    A Utah man has been released from a jail in Venezuela after spending nearly two years behind bars on weapons charges.

  • More LGBT issues loom as justices near wedding cake decision

    More LGBT issues loom as justices near wedding cake decision

    Saturday, May 26 2018 9:33 AM EDT2018-05-26 13:33:35 GMT
    Saturday, May 26 2018 9:25 PM EDT2018-05-27 01:25:22 GMT
    (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File). FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through the courts and will continue, no matter the outcome in the...(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File). FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through the courts and will continue, no matter the outcome in the...

    A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through courts and that'll continue, no matter what the Supreme Court decides in the case of a baker who wouldn't create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

    A flood of lawsuits over LGBT rights is making its way through courts and that'll continue, no matter what the Supreme Court decides in the case of a baker who wouldn't create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

Powered by Frankly