Prop 6: Impacts Beyond Water - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Prop 6: Impacts Beyond Water

Proposition 6 is by fair the hottest issue on this year's voting ballot. If passed Proposition 6 could help solve Texas' water crisis, but its impacts could go way passed the future of our water supply.

Whether or not Proposition 6 passes, it's going to have an impact on Texas' real estate. The price of a piece of property is heavily dependent on how easily it can access water.

Nortex Reality Owner and Broker Michael Detrick said "There is a big difference in what a rural piece of property is worth if it has access to a real water system...verses those properties that do not have access to a real water system."

Proposition 6 could eventually secure water for many areas.

"Prop 6 does not immediately deliver water to the entire state... The state of Texas does recognize the... critical nature of water to the value of property and to the future of this state," said Detrick.

If Proposition 6 passes and does solve our water problems, it could make Texas look more appealing to outsiders.

Detrick said "When people look from the outside in to Texas...They need to feel good about Texas in a lot of different ways and one of them is that it has a reliable water supply."

If Proposition 6 doesn't pass, it could send potential Texans the wrong message. No one would ever move to or start a business in an area that didn't have water. Water is essential for life.

Detrick adds if Proposition 6 doesn't pass, property value will not immediately depreciate. However, it would probably decrease over time if the drought continues.

James Parish, Newschannel

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