6 On Your Side: Excessive Expense? - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

6 On Your Side: Excessive Expense?

Non- profit and public service organizations are charged nearly $300 a month in electricity delivery fees.

ONCOR Customer Operations Manager for Texoma Sue Mercer said there are only two different categories that determine delivery charges: residential and general use.

If a building does not qualify as "residential", after crews conduct a field investigation of the place, then it defaults to "general use." The standard monthly delivery charge for this category is $294.78.

Assistant Chief at the Lake Kickapoo Volunteer Fire Department James Mellard said this charge makes up the vast majority of the VFD's bill each month.

Because the Lake Kickapoo VFD building is empty most of the time, they barely use any electricity. Mellard said their actual usage fees in the winter months are around $70 and about half that in the summer.

"I can kind of understand why it's zoned that way, but I mean, we're a public service organization. You know, we're here to provide EMS to the local residents and to provide fire services for the community here," said Mellard. "That's what we do, we do it all voluntarily, nobody makes any money off of this."

With no source of income besides donations, the VFD could really use the nearly $3,600 a year they spend on electricity delivery charges.

"That money could much better be used for training, for equipment needs...fuel, tires, you know, all of our consumables," said Mellard.

Mellard said they could train four new firefighters or get one of them EMT certified with those funds.



Christina Myers
cmyers@kauz.com

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