Pesky Pest Problem - KAUZ-TV: Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Pesky Pest Problem

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 Due to the continuing drought in Texoma, many people are conserving water in any way possible.

Texomans are even collecting water, but it's creating a perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes.

Vector control workers in Wichita Falls and Wichita County normally check and treat the usual areas around the county for mosquito larvae and pupa.

"Pretty much every time we come to this particular spot, there's larvae and pupa.  It just holds water really well, it's protected from the wind, it's shaded and it's a perfect environment," said vector control worker, Samantha Nichols.

Due to the recent rain in Wichita County and the amount of Texomans collecting rain water, a good amount of standing water is being found around homes.

"Especially with the recent rains, it's taking longer and we have to treat more areas," said Nichols.

Susan Morris with the Wichita Falls-Wichita County Health District said, if you collect rain water, you need to make sure the water is covered, screened or treated because it will breed mosquitoes.

"If they're collecting water in buckets in old swimming pools or even just a little bit in a pet dish for water, mosquitoes can multiply there very easily," said Morris.

All it takes for mosquitoes to breed is just a cap full of water from a can or bottle.  If you have standing water around your home, dump it out.

"We're in a drought, yes, but we've had some rain and people are collecting water.  Every little bit (of rain) that we get they're collecting," said Morris.

40 different species of mosquitoes live in Wichita Falls and Wichita County, but not all of them carry diseases.  Morris and other officials at the Public Health District want to concentrate on the areas where there are disease carrying mosquitoes.

Vector control workers will usually check and treat areas with larvicide in the morning and throughout the afternoon.

Spraying to control mosquitoes will be done around dusk and dawn when the mosquitoes are the most active.

Taylor Barnes, Newschannel 6