Wichita Falls Pothole Problems Addressed - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Wichita Falls Pothole Problems Addressed

Pothole problems in Wichita Falls may soon be a thing of the past. Right now, torn up roadways and massive dips can be spotted on just about every street around the city.

“It's probably doubled the number of pot holes,” said Larry Krugle, the Wichita Falls Street Superintendent. “I mean, you just cannot travel on asphalt in very many places in the city where you don't have potholes.”

Although potholes have been a problem around the city for a while, last month's flooding caused the number of them to double.  During the winter and rain the city is unable to get materials to do the work. Now that the rain is finally gone and most roads are dry, city officials said their work can begin.

“We're going to work overtime, and we should see those potholes being repaired,” said Krugle. “We'll start moving it through those now. But hopefully…giving us some time with the weather and the mix, then we'll be able to catch up again.”

On Monday, city crews were gearing up to try and tackle the problem. Asphalt truck employees loaded up 10 tons of asphalt to start the task of patching up rough roadways.

The asphalt trucks started getting to work around 2 p.m. Employees started repairs on Baylor Street starting at Trueheart Street.

“We have two asphalt pothole trucks that do the repairs,” said Krugle. “It's just hard to keep up, we're having them work overtime but it's a process.”

City officials said residents make numerous complaints a day about the potholes. Rhea Road is one of the streets most frequently reported. It's also an area that residents said is a daily hazard.

“Every day I pull out of my driveway, and I hit this pothole,” said Wichita Falls resident Kodi Teafatiller. “I'm scared it's going to pop my tires, every day.”

Teafatiller lives on Lavell, near Rhea Road. She said the dangerous conditions are often unavoidable.

“They're horrible and just little pieces of street have come up, and I hit those,” said Teafatiller. “There are really bad potholes over here on Cunningham Street and there's no way you can avoid them.”

But city leaders are working to change that.

They can start repairing potholes because now we have the mix to do it with,” said Krugle. “They got the rollers, the trucks are going. We'll work overtime to try and catch up.”

“That makes me happy,” said Teafatiller. “Maybe I won't have to replace my tires. I'm excited for them to start fixing them.”

The city spends about $120,000 a year on pothole repairs alone, according to Krugle. He said money is not the cause for the delay in repairs and will not limit the city on the number of repairs they can do.

Brittany Costello, Newschannel 6

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