Childress Police Chief to Freedom From Religion Foundation: "Go Fly a Kite"

Childress Police Chief to Freedom From Religion Foundation: "Go Fly a Kite"

With one letter, Chief Adrian Garcia of the Childress Police Department became famous overnight. 
"Dear Annie, 
After carefully reading your letter, I must deny your request to remove our nation's motto from our patrol units, and ask that you and the Freedom of Religion Foundation go fly a kite."
The C.P.D Facebook post of that letter has been viewed by more than 6.5-million people, and has received more than 100,000 likes.  Many might argue that he has become a celebrity.  He thinks otherwise.
"I don't see it like that, that's not my goal," Chief Adrian Garcia said. "My goal is to show patriotism." 
Chief Garcia insists the "In God We Trust" decal is not about religion, despite the fact that he surrounds himself with religious imagery, including portraits of Saint Michael. 
"Law enforcement, that's all we want to do is be patriotic cause we serve not only the community but also the country," he said.
However, there are a few people who have complained about the decals.  Nationwide, 57 people have filed a complaint with the Freedom From Religion Foundation based out of Wisconsin.  One of those complaints came from a resident in Childress.
Annie Gaylor is the president of the Wisconsin-based FFRF, a national advocacy group fighting the battle of church and state, as their hold music reinforces.  She said the national motto itself is unconstitutional.
"We think its very inappropriate for them to put "In God We Trust" on their cars," Gaylor stated. "It's chilling because it seems that they really work for God and not for us.  It's very unprofessional."
Chief Garcia had argued that it is unprofessional to require the department to take the nation motto off their units.
While a few people don't like the decals the chief said he has received an overwhelming support, from some surprising sources.
"There have been a lot of atheists sayings that its not religion based, that's its patriotic, which it is," Chief Garcia explained.
He continues to insist the only way these decals are coming down is through a Supreme Court Order.
These decals increased in frequency in Texas after Harris County Deputy Darren Goforth was killed in August.
Annie Gaylor said the decals are nothing but a ploy to divert attention from recent police brutality and racism cases involving law enforcement.
On Tuesday, local Texas leaders like State Senator Charles Perry and State Representative Drew Springer expressed there support for the Childress Police Department.
Chief Garcia said he's going to let his attorneys take it from here, while he continues to make sure the Childress community is safe.
Dave Caulfield, Newschannel 6