Wichita Co. monitoring possible impact of lost residency program - Newschannel 6 Now | Wichita Falls, TX

Wichita Co. monitoring possible impact of lost residency program

Community partners say Wichita Co. low-income health care patients will still get all their needs met. (Source: KAUZ) Community partners say Wichita Co. low-income health care patients will still get all their needs met. (Source: KAUZ)
WICHITA FALLS, Tx (RNN Texoma) -

For the last year and a half, Wichita County has been working on revamping its low-income health care program. 

But questions are being raised after the termination of the Wichita Falls Residency program and Wichita County isn't sure what's going to happen next.

They still don't know exactly how the closure of the residency program will affect the low-income health care program, but they're remaining optimistic and continuing to make improvements hoping the change doesn't impact their patients.

"Obviously there was some concern on our part that our indigent clients would feel some effect from that closure," Precinct 1 Commissioner, Mark Beauchamp said.

Commissioner Beauchamp said when he got the news, he was shocked.

"It was a little curveball at first," he said.

Since Commissioner Beachamp was elected into office, he has spearheaded a project to revamp the county's low-income health care program.

In 2016 Wichita County spent $760,000 on 819 patients.

Since then both numbers have dramatically decreased leading to more efficiency, tax dollars being saved, and better care for patients.

"We're still undergoing many improvements," Commissioner Beauchamp said. "Changes and modifications within that office."

That's part of the reason why Commissioners were concerned.

"We do want to make sure our clients are serviced and all of our clients are getting serviced as they need to be," Commissioner Beauchamp said.

That's exactly what the community partners told Commissioner Beauchamp.

"There may be some lag in time," he said. "But they still will be seen as they always have been."

Commissioner Beauchamp said the county will wait and see how the change impacts their patients.

If it does, they will address the problems immediately.

But Commissioner Beauchamp thinks the change can be good if executed properly.

"Like anything else, change is something different and it's going to take time to learn and see what the change entails," he said.

Commissioner Beauchamp said if anyone in the low-income health care program has issues in the coming months, let them know so they can address it and make sure everyone is being taken care of.

He said right now they are working on pinpointing some of the most common diagnosis of their patients. 

That way they can get them into education programs to start living healthier lives.

Copyright 2018 RNN Texoma. All Rights Reserved.

  • News HeadlinesNewsMore>>

  • US says conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative

    US says conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative

    Sunday, August 19 2018 7:26 AM EDT2018-08-19 11:26:45 GMT
    Sunday, August 19 2018 8:47 PM EDT2018-08-20 00:47:34 GMT
    The Trump administration says conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S. (Source: Pixabay)The Trump administration says conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S. (Source: Pixabay)

    The Trump administration says conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S.

    The Trump administration says conserving oil is no longer an economic imperative for the U.S.

  • Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges US West wildfires

    Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges US West wildfires

    Sunday, August 19 2018 11:27 AM EDT2018-08-19 15:27:02 GMT
    Sunday, August 19 2018 8:22 PM EDT2018-08-20 00:22:48 GMT
    (AP Photo/Noah Berger). FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, firefighters monitor a backfire while battling the Ranch Fire, part of the Mendocino Complex Fire near Ladoga, Calif. The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hot...(AP Photo/Noah Berger). FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, firefighters monitor a backfire while battling the Ranch Fire, part of the Mendocino Complex Fire near Ladoga, Calif. The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hot...

    An AP analysis finds a clear connection between warmer temperatures out west and more land burned by wildfires.

    An AP analysis finds a clear connection between warmer temperatures out west and more land burned by wildfires.

  • 'Crazy Rich Asians' shines bright at the box office

    'Crazy Rich Asians' shines bright at the box office

    Sunday, August 19 2018 11:37 AM EDT2018-08-19 15:37:04 GMT
    Sunday, August 19 2018 7:58 PM EDT2018-08-19 23:58:28 GMT
    (Sanja Bucko/Warner Bros. Entertainment via AP). This image released by Warner Bros. Entertainment shows Constance Wu in a scene from the film "Crazy Rich Asians."(Sanja Bucko/Warner Bros. Entertainment via AP). This image released by Warner Bros. Entertainment shows Constance Wu in a scene from the film "Crazy Rich Asians."

    Glitz has won out over guns at the North American box office this weekend as the gilded romance "Crazy Rich Asians" took No. 1 over Mark Wahlberg's action-packed "Mile 22".

    Glitz has won out over guns at the North American box office this weekend as the gilded romance "Crazy Rich Asians" took No. 1 over Mark Wahlberg's action-packed "Mile 22".

Powered by Frankly