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Texas sheriff’s deputy dies while rescuing victims of Eastland Complex Fire

Barbara Fenley died while rescuing people impacted by the Eastland Complex Fire.  Photo used...
Barbara Fenley died while rescuing people impacted by the Eastland Complex Fire. Photo used with family's permission.(Fire Photo: Texas A&M Forest Service, Deputy Photo: Courtesy Family)
Published: Mar. 18, 2022 at 1:34 PM CDT
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EASTLAND COUNTY, Texas (KWTX) - Eastland County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Barbara Fenley died while rescuing people impacted by the Eastland Complex Fire in Eastland County, according to the Cisco Police Department.

“It is with very heavy hearts that today we learned of the death of one our Eastland County Deputies who put it all on the line last night trying to save people from the horrible fires,” the Cisco Police Department announced on Facebook.

“Our sister Barbara Fenley will be deeply missed. She was a special servant and an attribute to our profession.”

In a Facebook post, Jon Fenley thanked those who have reached out to offer condolences over the death of his mother.

“I wanna thank everyone for the thoughts and prayers, and I wanna thank everyone for helping us find mom. Unfortunately, with the saddest news, my mom has passed away. I just ask that you give us privacy in this moment while we collect our thoughts. I love everyone and I know she loved everyone and she loved the community of Gorman and Eastland County.”

According to the Associated Press, low humidity and gusty winds fueled multiple wildfires Friday in Texas, burning homes and other structures and prompting evacuations of hundreds of homes in small communities.

Several wildfires merged to form what fire officials call a “complex” that was burning near Eastland, about 130 miles northwest of Waco.

As of Friday morning, the fires had burned about 62.5 square miles, according to Texas A&M Forest Service.

It was only two percent contained and fires were burning in thick brush and grass fields. The forest service warned that the “rare, high impact wildfire phenomenon” could also affect parts of Oklahoma and Kansas.

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